Auto Loan Fraud Soars

Up to 1% of car loan applications include deception, firm says

Borrower fraud in U.S. auto loans is surging, and may approach levels seen in mortgages during last decade’s housing bubble, according to a startup firm that helps lenders sniff out bogus borrowers. As many as 1 percent of U.S. car loan applications include some type of material misrepresentation, executives at data analytics firm Point Predictive estimated based on reports from banks, finance companies and others. Lenders’ losses from deception may double this year to $6 billion from 2015, the firm forecast.

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The Next Financial Crisis Might Be in Your Driveway

With late payments on the rise, a dealership upsell begins to look dangerous.

Lured by low interest rates, low gas prices, and a crop of seductive vehicles that are faster, smarter, and more efficient than ever before, American drivers are increasingly riding in style. Don’t be fooled by the curb appeal, though-those swanky machines are heavily leveraged.

The country’s auto debt hit a record in the fourth quarter of 2016, according to the Federal Reserve Bank of New York, when a rush of year-end car shopping pushed vehicle loans to a dubious peak of $1.16 trillion. The combination of new car smell and new credit woes stretches from Subarus in Maine to Teslas in San Francisco.

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Auto Sales: The Party May be Over

usd_car_lotCar sales are near record levels. But this is a time of uncertainty for the industry, not celebration.

Sales are showing signs of leveling off. When December figures come in Wednesday, they may be enough to eke out a seventh straight year of gains, edging past last year’s record of 17.5 million cars and trucks. But sales are expected to fall in 2017.

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